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Your Guide to Grading on the Access HE Diploma

 

The Students’ Guide to Grading on the AHE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

What is in this Guide?. 2

YouTube Guides. 3

What is an Access HE Diploma?. 3

What is the difference between Ungraded and Graded units?. 4

Why are some units graded on the Access to HE Diploma?. 4

Graded Units and Grade Descriptors. 5

Why are there Grade Descriptors and Components?. 6

How do the tutors grade my work?. 7

How does the tutor determine the final grade for a graded assessment?. 8

How does the tutor determine the final grade for a unit?. 8

Grade Profile Examples. 9

Can I submit drafts of my work?. 13

Can I improve the grades I have received on an assignment by submitting it again?. 13

Deadlines. 13

What if I need an extension?. 13

What if I submit my work late?. 13

What if I don’t achieve the Assessment Criteria for an ungraded assignment?. 14

What if I don’t achieve the Assessment Criteria for a graded assignment?. 14

What if I don’t achieve the Assessment Criteria on a resubmission?. 15

Feedback. 16

I have received a percentage for a test. Why?. 17

Consistency of assessment across AIM providers. 17

What if I disagree with a grading decision?. 17

How are grades shown when the Access to HE Diploma is awarded?. 18

What if I cannot complete my Access to HE Diploma this year?. 18

What about UCAS Points?. 18

Further information. 18

The Grade Descriptors as set out by the QAA. 18

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is in this Guide?

 

AIM Awards is the awarding body responsible for awarding your Access to HE Diploma. In this guide, we will explain why and how grading forms part of the assessment of the Access to Higher Education Diplomas.

 

We hope you find this guide helpful and we wish you the very best of luck on your Access to HE Diploma.

YouTube Guides

At AIM Awards we have created a number of short YouTube guides that you can watch to support your understanding of how assessment and grading works on the Access to HE Diploma. You can find them on the AIM Awards YouTube channel here

What is an Access HE Diploma?

                                                                                                                                         The generic requirements for the Access to HE Diploma, set out by the QAA (Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education), are as follows:

·        the total credit achievement for an Access to HE Diploma is 60 credits. Students undertaking any Access to HE Diploma, whatever their mode of study or Diploma title, must be registered and certificated for units to a maximum value of 60 credits.

·        of these 60 credits, 45 credits must be achieved at level 3 from graded units which are concerned with academic subject content (what constitutes academic subject content is defined by QAA in The Access to Higher Education Diploma specification 2013).

·        the remaining 15 credits must be achieved at level 2 or level 3 from units which are ungraded.

 

All students registered with AIM Awards will study on a Discrete Diploma that has been designed by your provider and approved by AIM Awards.

 

All Diplomas are made up of 60 credits in line with QAA requirements. 45 of the 60 credits are made up of Academic Subject Content units. These must be achieved at Level 3 and are graded at Pass, Merit or Distinction. The remaining 15 credits are made up of Study Skills and/or ungraded subject content units and may be achieved at Level 2 or Level 3 but are not graded.

 

 

 

What is the difference between Ungraded and Graded units?

 

According to the QAA, All Diplomas must contain 15 credits derived from either level 2 or ungraded level 3 units. The content of ungraded units at either level may be concerned with study skills or generic English or maths, and at level 3 may also be concerned with academic subject content relevant to the title of the Diploma. You can see what your ungraded units are on your Discrete Diploma Specification for your Diploma. For ungraded units you can gain a result of either ‘Achieved’ or ‘Not Achieved’. You will not receive a grade for ungraded units. Ungraded units allow you the opportunity to develop essential study skills for success on your course as well as for success in Higher Education, to develop maths and/or English skills and/or to get to grips with subject content before you start undertaking graded work. Sometimes the assessments for ungraded units will be embedded in other units to reduce the amount of assessments you undertake and to extend your learning in certain assessments. If this is the case, your provider will explain this to you.

 

Suggested Activity: Check what your ungraded units are in. Which of them do you feel most confident in? Which do you think will be the most useful to you?

 

What is the difference between a credit and a grade?

 

Credit is awarded when your assessed work displays evidence that all of the Learning Outcomes of a unit have been met as specified in the unit assessment criteria. Credit is awarded for both ungraded and graded units. So, you get credit for every unit you achieve but you only get a grade for the graded units you achieve. Your Discrete Diploma Specification for your Diploma will make it clear which units are ungraded and which are graded.

Why are some units graded on the Access to HE Diploma?

 

QAA introduced graded Level 3 units for the Access to HE Diploma after several years of consultation with Access tutors, Higher Education Admissions tutors, Access students and other appropriate organisations. Feedback showed that:

1.     Access students wanted different levels of achievement to be rewarded, so that those who worked hard and produced high quality assignments could be identified.

2.      HE Admissions tutors felt that, in an increasingly competitive HE environment, they needed to be able to justify why they had selected particular students and feel confident that the students would be able to cope with the demanding HE workload.

3.      Access tutors felt that grading would motivate students to reach their full potential and support the information they gave Higher Education Institutions when supplying references.

 

Suggested Activity: Completing an Access to HE Diploma is an achievement in itself. You should be proud of yourself for undertaking this challenge! There are many reasons why you might have started the course and many career paths you might have in mind. However, if you have started your Access to HE Diploma with a very specific university course in mind it is a good idea to check the entry requirements for those courses now, if you haven’t already. This is to find out if they require applicants to achieve a certain amount of Merits or Distinctions or a certain amount of UCAS points, so you know what to aim for. Watch the UCAS guide for Access to HE students here for more information.

Graded Units and Grade Descriptors

 

On Graded Units, 7 different Grade Descriptors can be utilised. You will gain a grade for each of the Grade Descriptors applied to an assessment and you will gain an overall grade for a unit. The Grade Descriptors offer seven key areas for measuring performance. They are as follows:

 

1Understanding of the subject

2.Application of knowledge

3.Application of skills

5.Communication and presentation

4.Using Information

6.Autonomy/

independence

7.Quality

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Each Grade Descriptor has different components within it that can be focused on and these will be made clear in your assessment information. Each graded unit is assigned a set of the above grade descriptors by AIM Awards in consultation with subject specialists. All grade descriptors assigned to a unit must be used. They vary from one unit to another because not all units offer an opportunity for the skills listed in a particular grade descriptor to be demonstrated. However, the combination of units studied by the student throughout the course ensures the skills required for that particular Diploma are covered. Grade Descriptor 7, Quality, is assigned to all units. Every unit and every assessment will have at least 2 Grade Descriptors assigned to it and they will always include Grade Descriptor 7.

Grade Descriptor components

 

Each grade descriptor is made up of a set of 'components' which describe different aspects of the skills being assessed. The requirements for Merit and Distinction are listed separately. Tutors decide which components to use from the descriptors assigned to a unit, selecting those most appropriate for the assignment being set.

 

The selected components are identified in the assignment brief given to you as a student, so you will be aware of what is required to achieve a Merit or Distinction before starting work. A Pass is achieved by meeting the assessment criteria for the unit at Level 3, so there are no components for this grade. Grade descriptors are not weighted – all have equal value. Full details of the components that relate to each descriptor can be found at the end of this guide.

Why are there Grade Descriptors and Components?

 

Grade Descriptors and Components are different to other marking systems in education. You may be wondering: why don’t I just get one Grade or a percentage? Rest assured that lots of thought and planning went into the QAA Access to HE Diploma marking system. Grade Descriptors and Components are designed to allow you to achieve in different key areas for measuring performance. Each Grade Descriptor and Component breaks down the areas of learning you use in an assignment, so once you have met the Assessment Criteria for an assignment your performance in the different areas of skill, knowledge or experience that you put into producing that assignment can be assessed. For example, you might have excellent communication and presentation skills already so you may achieve a Distinction in this area for a particular assignment. However, you might need to work on the application of knowledge and achieve only a pass or a merit for that Grade Descriptor on this assignment. This allows your tutor to give you targeted feedback on where you have done well and where you can improve. It also ensures that your talents and learning are rewarded based on the different areas that the Grade Descriptors allow for measuring performance in – instead of one overall grade for an assessment, you get a grade for each area of the Grade Descriptors applied.

 

 

Suggested Activity: Look again at the Grade Descriptors below. Which do you think is your strongest area at this time? Which area are you most excited to develop? Which do you think will be the most challenging?

 

1Understanding of the subject

2.Application of knowledge

3.Application of skills

5.Communication and presentation

4.Using Information

6.Autonomy/

independence

7.Quality

 

How do the tutors grade my work?

 

For all units, the first thing the tutor will do is consider your assignment to see if it has meet the stated Assessment Criteria. The Assessment Criteria are detailed for you on your assessment briefs and/or task assessment records. If you are ever unsure of the assessment criteria for an assessment, make sure you check your guidance carefully and contact a tutor if you still can’t find the answer. For ungraded units, you need to meet all of the Assessment Criteria to achieve the unit. For a Graded assessment, you need to achieve all of the Assessment Criteria before the work can then be considered for further grading. So, in an Ungraded unit the tutor is checking to see if you have achieved all of the Assessment Criteria and is providing you with feedback on your work. In a Graded Assessment the tutor is looking to see if you have met all of the Assessment Criteria and providing you with feedback in relation to these. Furthermore, if you have met the Assessment Criteria,  the tutor will go on to grade your work in relation to the Grade Descriptors applied to that assessment. They will then provide you with an individual grade for each Grade Descriptor applied to the assignment and will provide you with feedback in relation to these in order to help you develop your future work.

 

 

How does the tutor determine the final grade for a graded assessment?

 

For each graded assessment, you will receive either a P and M or a D for each Grade Descriptor allocated to that assessment. However, you will not receive one final grade for the assessment. For example, if your unit has Grade Descriptors 2, 5 and 7 allocated you might get the following Grades for your assessment:

 

Grade Descriptor 2

P

Grade Descriptor 5

M

Grade Descriptor 7

M

 

You won’t receive an overall grade for the assessment – you will instead receive as many grades as there are Grade Descriptors attached to that assessment. You receive final grades for completed graded units rather than completed graded assignments. So, if your unit has only one assessment then the final grade for the unit will be made up of the grades you have received for that assessment. If your unit is made up of more than one assessment you will receive a final grade based on all of the Grade Descriptors for that unit. In the next section, we will look at some examples of graded unit task assessment records to help clarify this.

How does the tutor determine the final grade for a unit?

 

A final grade for a unit is determined once all work for that unit has been assessed and graded. The grades you have received for the unit will be lined up in order of grade to form a Grade Profile. For example, on a unit with 3 Grade Descriptors assigned where all 3 Grade Descriptors have been used twice you would receive 6 grades. These would be lined up in order of grade, for example PPMMDD. The final grade for the unit is the mid-point of the list of grade indicators when placed in order of grade. So, for a Grade Profile of PPMDD the overall grade for the unit would be Merit as this is the clear midpoint. For our earlier example of PPMMDD the midpoint would fall between two Ms so the overall grade would also be a Merit. For a unit with no clear midpoint, for example PPMDDD, the decision about the final grade for the unit is made by the tutor using their professional judgement about your work for that unit and could be decided in this instance as either a Merit or a Distinction. When making this decision on units with no clear midpoint using their professional judgement, tutors may use Grade Descriptor 7 (‘Quality’), which looks at the level of overall performance in responding to the assessment brief, as the deciding factor when determining the final grade for the unit.

 

Please note that there is no weighting of individual assignments – all grade indicators produced by assessing student work count equally towards the final grade for the unit.

 

Now, let’s look at some examples to clarify the grading process.

Grade Profile Examples

Take a look at the examples on the following pages to see some completed Graded Unit Assessment Plan and Record Summaries that show how an overall unit grade is established for a Graded Unit.

 


 

 

 


Graded Unit Assessment Plan and Record Summary

A copy of this document must be available for Internal Verification and External Moderation.

 

provider

logo

 

 

 

Assessor

A.     Tutor

Discrete Diploma

Humanities

Subject

English

Unit

Appreciation of a Shakespeare Play

Code

CAN846

No.  of credits

6

No. of LOs

5

GDs

1257

 

Start date

25 February 201-

Completion date

30 April 201-

 

 

 

 

Student

Your Name

Responses to all tasks have been claimed by the student to be their own.

P

Unit Assessment Plan

Unit (indicative) grade profile

Task, Form of Assessment and Title

AC

GD/C

Draft

Deadline

Submission 

Deadline

1

2

5

7

1.    

On-line discussion and written description.

 Structure and Character.

 

2.1

3.1

1b, 2a, 2b, 2c,

7c

 

27.03

     31.03

P

M

 

M

2.    

Notes

Dramatic effect of Language

 

4.1

1a

2a, 2c

7c

n/a

11.04

P

P

 

P

3.    

Time-constrained essay

Assessing Linguistic Devices.

 

 

4.2

1b

2a, 2c

5 register, 7a

n/a

13.04

 

P

M

P

P

4.    

Article (genre and themes)

King Lear: A Current Tragedy

1.1

5.1

2a, 2b

5 spelling, punctuation, referencing; 7b

23.04

30.04

 

D

P

M

IN THIS EXAMPLE, THE UNIT HAS A CLEAR MIDPOINT IN THE GRADES AWARDED ACROSS ALL ASSIGNMENTS. THE UNIT GRADE IS A CLEAR PASS.

 PPPPPPPPMMMMD

UNIT GRADE

 

   P

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Graded Unit Assessment Plan and Record Summary

A copy of this document must be available for Internal Verification and External Moderation.

 

provider

logo

 

Assessor

A.     Tutor

Discrete Diploma

Health Professions

Subject

Biology

Unit

Biodiversity

 

Code

CBF101

No.  of credits

6

No. of LOs

5

GDs

12457

 

Start date

25 February 201-

Completion date

30 April 201-

 

 

 

 

Student

Your Name

Responses to all tasks have been claimed by the student to be their own.

P

Unit Assessment Plan

Unit (indicative) grade profile

Task, Form of Assessment and Title

AC

GD/C

Draft

Deadline

Submission 

Deadline

1

2

4

5

7

1.

Written Description

 

2.1

 

1b, 5 referencing, 7c

 

   n/a

     31.03

M

 

 

D

D

2.

Project

 

1.1, 1.2, 3.1, 32

1a

2a, 2c, 4a, 4c, 5 structure,

7c

25.03

11.04

M

M

M

D

D

IN THIS EXAMPLE, THERE IS NO CLEAR MIDPOINT AND THE TUTOR MUST USE THEIR PROFESSIONAL JUDGEMENT TO DECIDE ON THE FINAL UNIT GRADE. IN THIS INSTANCE, THEY HAVE DECIDED ON A DISTINCTION.

MMMMDDDD

UNIT GRADE

 

   

 D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Graded Unit Assessment Plan and Record Summary

A copy of this document must be available for Internal Verification and External Moderation.

 

provider

logo

 

Assessor

C.Tutor

Discrete Diploma

Business

Subject

Business

Unit

Teamwork and Leadership

 

Code

CBF796

No.  of credits

3

No. of LOs

3

GDs

1247

 

Start date

25 February 201-

Completion date

30 April 201-

 

 

 

 

Student

Your Name

Responses to all tasks have been claimed by the student to be their own.

P

Unit Assessment Plan

Unit (indicative) grade profile

Task, Form of Assessment and Title

AC

GD/C

Draft

Deadline

Submission 

Deadline

1

2

4

7

1.

Case Study

 

2.1

 

1c, 2 perspectives, b, 4a 7c

 

   n/a

     31.03

M

P

D

 

M

 

IN THIS EXAMPLE, THERE IS ONLY ONE ASSESSMENT IN THE UNIT. THERE IS A CLEAR MIDPOINT BETWEEN TWO M GRADES.

PMMD    

UNIT GRADE

 

   

 M

 

 

 

 


Can I submit drafts of my work?

 

Tutors may offer students the opportunity to submit a draft for review and feedback. Your assignment briefs will make it clear whether or not you can submit a draft.

Can I improve the grades I have received on an assignment by submitting it again?

 

No. This is not something that is possible on an Access to HE Diploma. The Access to HE Diploma seeks to prepare you for Higher Education, where resubmitting work to enhance the grade will not be possible either. An assignment is successful when all the Assessment Criteria for the assignment have been met and, in relation to graded units, it is therefore eligible for grading. Work which is successful may not be resubmitted in order to improve the grades achieved. You can use your feedback to improve your performance in future assignments and to support you to improve your work once you have achieved a place at university.

Deadlines

 

The ability to submit work to deadlines is an essential requirement to progress into Higher Education. The deadlines for your work will be made clear on your assignment briefs or as part of your individual learning plan, depending on your centre. The schedule of assessment deadlines is coordinated by the programme manager/discrete Diploma leader at your provider and is agreed with unit tutors to ensure that it is manageable for students. It is anticipated that, once submitted, work will be assessed by unit tutors and feedback given to students within two working weeks of the submission date.

What If I need an extension?

 

If you need an extension, contact your tutor. Unit tutors may agree an extension period of up to two weeks by negotiation and where genuine reasons can be evidenced. In exceptional circumstances, you may be granted longer than two weeks to submit. However, a longer extension would need to be supported by the personal tutor/discrete Diploma leader.

What if I submit my work late?

 

If you submit your work late without an approved extension but it does meet the stated assessment criteria then it can be assessed. However, graded work will be capped at a pass. This is also the case for late resubmissions (see below for information on resubmissions). If an assignment is late and it does not meet the assessment criteria then there is no

 

opportunity for resubmission on this work. Tutors may decide to set a different assignment or you may seek the opportunity to complete the work again via the referrals process (see below).

What if I don’t achieve the Assessment Criteria for an ungraded assignment? 

 

If you do not achieve the Assessment Criteria set for an ungraded assignment, your work will be returned to you with feedback explaining what you need to do. This is called a resubmission. You will be given a deadline by your tutor. If you submit your resubmission on time and meet the assessment criteria then the assignment is achieved.

What if I don’t achieve the Assessment Criteria for a graded assignment?

 

If you do not achieve the Assessment Criteria set for a graded unit, you also have the opportunity for a resubmission. Assignments submitted for graded units that do not achieve the stated assessment criteria are not eligible for further grading. You will receive feedback on what you need to do to meet the assessment criteria but you will not receive any feedback relating to the grade descriptors and components. You will be given a deadline for this work and if you submit it on time and the resubmitted assignment meets the assessment criteria then it is eligible for further grading.

The flow chart below will help you to understand the resubmission process.

 

 

What if I don’t achieve the Assessment Criteria on a resubmission?

 

A student whose resubmission (submission 2) fails to meet all the assessment criteria may request a referral. This is the opportunity to make a second resubmission (submission 3). The request is made of the assessor and Internal Verifier who collate evidence and subsequently convey the request to the Centre Lead Moderator . All requests for referrals will be conveyed to the Centre Lead Moderator for confirmation or challenge. If all of the assessment criteria are met on  an ungraded referral then the assignment is achieved. If they are not met, the it is failed. In graded units if all assessment criteria are met, achievement is capped at a pass. If all assessment criteria are not met the result is a fail. Please note that a student is limited to referrals for assessments to a maximum of 15 credits.

 

 

 

 

The flow chart below will help you to understand the referrals process.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feedback

 

Feedback opportunities are essential for your progress and development as a student. Students need to understand the reasons for the grades given for their work as well as how to improve their performance. Your tutors will give you written feedback identifying how you have performed in relation to the components of the Grade Descriptors on each assignment as well as on the assessment criteria. You may also receive opportunities for oral feedback or opportunities to discuss your written feedback with your tutors.

Suggested Activity: Have you tried keeping a feedback chart? When you receive feedback on an assignment create a document, wall chart or checklist to help you enact that feedback in all of your future assignments and to use as part of your proofreading process. Before drafting and submitting an assignment, check it over with the feedback you have received on other assignments in mind.  

I have received a percentage for a test. Why?

 

Numerical marks including percentages are not used to describe performance except in circumstances where the only answer is right or wrong, such as in mathematics tests. The numerical marks are then converted into grades and used to contribute to the overall grade profile for the unit, along with those from other grade descriptors. The only grade descriptors which are eligible for Numerical marking are: 1 - Understanding of the subject and 3 - Application of skills. If numerical marking is used for both grade descriptor 1 and 3, then different aspects of the work are assessed. 

Consistency of assessment across AIM providers

 

AIM Awards Access to HE providers have in place internal moderation systems to ensure that standards of assessment are consistent. This means that your work will be part of the provider’s internal moderation sampling plan and subject to checking by more than one tutor. In addition to internal moderation, AIM Awards also undertake external moderation visits throughout the year. External moderators check every aspect of the provider’s systems and sample course work to ensure assessment and grading are fair and consistent. The Center Lead Moderator in charge of external moderation for your provider will also contact students throughout the year to gain your feedback and views. AIM Awards also hold standardisation events across the region so that tutors can meet with other subject specialists, attend assessment training and compare samples of work to ensure they are all marking to the same standard. A Pass, Merit or Distinction should be awarded for the same standard of work by all providers.

What if I disagree with a grading decision?

 

If you are unhappy with a grade you have been awarded then you should contact your tutor as soon as possible. Each provider will have their own internal appeals procedure. If a satisfactory conclusion cannot be reached then the programme manager at your provider will consult with the AIM Awards Centre Lead Moderator. You can find the AIM Awards Complaints and Appeals process in the Handbooks and Forms section of our website here.

 

 

 

 

According to the QAA, QAA Grading Guidance part E, if a student is unhappy with the grade the tutor has awarded for a unit they should inform the tutor as soon as possible (normally within one week of receiving the assessed work). This is called a ‘representation’. The tutor should discuss the work with the student, explaining why the decision was made. If an administrative error was made this should be corrected. If the student wishes to pursue the representation further, an appropriately qualified member of staff or an internal moderator should consider the work and decide if the grade should be confirmed or if the work should be reassessed. If the grade is confirmed the students may still appeal against the decision and this will be referred back to the Awards Board. The grounds for appeal about the award of credits or grades on the Access to HE Diploma courses are only permitted against aspects of the process and not against academic judgement. They are restricted to: evidence of administrative error in the assessment process and/or extenuating circumstances that, for good reason, could not be notified prior to the awards board.

How are grades shown when the Access to HE Diploma is awarded?

 

There is no overall or aggregate grade awarded for the Access to HE Diploma. Students receive a Grade Profile listing the grades they have achieved for all Level 3 units within their Diploma. Some universities and university courses will want you to achieve a certain amount of Merits and/or Distinctions to meet their entry requirements. For more information on this, watch the UCAS guide for Access to HE students here.

What if I cannot complete my Access to HE Diploma this year?

 

Under QAA regulations, credit may be accumulated towards the Access to HE Diploma over 5 years. This means you have 5 years to complete your Diploma. Please contact your tutor if you have any concerns about not being able to complete your Diploma.

What about UCAS Points?

 

If you have questions or concerns about how your Access to HE Diploma relates to UCAS points there is an excellent video guide from UCAS that you can watch here.

Further information

 

The AIM Awards Student Guide to Grading gives an overview of the grading process. Further, more detailed information may be found on the QAA website here.

The Grade Descriptors as set out by the QAA

 

Full information on the grade descriptors from QAA can be found here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Safeguarding is everyone’s responsibility, regardless of your personal circumstances, job role and no matter how frequently you work with children or their families. This Introduction to Safeguarding Children course aims to help you understand more about your responsibilities so that you feel confident to recognise the potential signs of abuse and report any concerns that you may have. This workbook will help you to understand what safeguarding is, what you need to do if you have a safeguarding concern and empower you to take responsibility for your own safety.


Safeguarding is everyone’s responsibility, regardless of your personal circumstances, job role and no matter how frequently you work with children or their families. This Introduction to Safeguarding Children course aims to help you understand more about your responsibilities so that you feel confident to recognise the potential signs of abuse and report any concerns that you may have. This workbook will help you to understand what safeguarding is, what you need to do if you have a safeguarding concern and empower you to take responsibility for your own safety.



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